FAQ

means being empowered to prevent or manage health conditions and your quality of life. We vigorously support this through providing you the resources to make the vital decisions to continuously increase your well being in order for you to advance toward wholeness in all areas of life Healthy Living means being empowered to prevent or manage health conditions and your quality of life. We vigorously support this through providing you the resources to make the vital decisions to continuously increase your well being in order for you to advance toward wholeness in all areas of life . You have the opportunity to start fresh TODAY! Do not let past failures or recent setbacks stop you from becoming the person you truly want to be. You can overcome any obstacle with the right attitude.

Remember be positive and surround yourself with others who encourage that outlook. This Is The First Day Of The Rest Of Your Life: You have the opportunity to start fresh TODAY! Do not let past failures or recent setbacks stop you from becoming the person you truly want to be. You can overcome any obstacle with the right attitude. Remember be positive and surround yourself with others who encourage that outlook. Many American shoppers, influenced by the low carbohydrate craze, are steering clear of the bread and cereal aisles.

It's time to set the story straight. Whole grain breads and cereals, even whole grain pastas, offer multiple health benefits and play an important role in personal nutrition. All Carbs Are Not Created Equal During the earlier low fat diet fad, carbohydrates were dieters' best starchy friends. Today, "carbohydrate" has become a dirty word. But as with fat, not all carbohydrates are bad carbohydrates. Many nutritionists today make a distinction between refined and complex carbohydrates, recognizing that consumption of the latter, including whole grains, is a central part of a healthy diet.

Your body converts carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Insulin carries the glucose to your cells, which burn the glucose for energy. Your body steadily digests complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, converting them to glucose and carrying glucose to your cells at a steady rate. Your body quickly processes highly refined carbohydrates such as white bread, causing a rush of glucose production, which leads to increased insulin production. If your body produces too much insulin, your cells may eventually become resistant to insulin, keeping glucose in your blood and out of your cells. Too much glucose in the blood can eventually damage your kidneys and other organs.

Too much insulin also promotes the formation of fat. And insulin resistance is a precursor to full-blown Type 2 (adult onset) diabetes. Refined grains also lack many of the nutrients found in less processed grains. Milling wheat, for example, splits the grain into three components: the endosperm, the bran, and the wheat germ. Bran is a good source of fiber, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, and zinc. Wheat germ also contains vitamins - thiamine, riboflavin, niacin - as well as magnesium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, protein, and unsaturated fats.

These are tossed out during the refining process. Why Whole Grains Are Healthy In addition to providing valuable vitamins and minerals, whole grains have protective powers. In two studies, people who got lots of fiber through whole grains (eating the equivalent of one bowl of oatmeal and two slices of whole wheat bread a day) were 30 percent less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than study participants who ate the lowest amount of fiber. Whole grains have been shown to give women extra protection against heart disease: Eating cereal with 5 grams of fiber a day may reduce their likelihood of heart disease by 33 percent. Whole grains protect the rest of your body, too. The fiber found in many whole grains contributes to healthy levels of glucose and insulin.

Fiber also reduces constipation, lowers cholesterol, and may help stave off blood clots. Whole grain consumption has even been linked to lower occurrences of several types of cancer, including breast, colon, esophageal, gallbladder, lung, mouth, ovarian, prostate, and stomach. (Note: Recent research indicates it's the entire "whole grain" package that contributes to cancer fighting, not the fiber alone. ) Whole grains possess powerful immune system-boosting antioxidants and other plant chemicals, too. "Diets rich in whole grain foods and other plant foods, and low in saturated fats and cholesterol, may help reduce the risk of heart disease". Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration allowed makers of whole grain products to list this beneficial phrase on their packaging.

Finding this endorsement is a quick way to identify a whole grain item. Breads and cereals are your best food sources of whole grains. If a package doesn't contain the FDA-approved phrase, look at the ingredient list to discern whether a product truly contains whole grains. Look for the word "whole" at the very top of the ingredient list: whole wheat, whole oats, and whole rye, for example. Beyond reading labels, the simple mantra "less processed is better" helps. For breakfast, eat cereals made with whole wheat, whole oats, whole barley, and other whole grains.

If you like it hot, opt for steel cut oats or old-fashioned oatmeal. Of all the whole grains, oats pack one of the most fiber-filled punches. Brown rice is a whole grain, though white rice is not. Pastas and couscous come in whole grain varieties. Even veggie-based pastas (e. g.

spinach) typically have more fiber than regular pasta. Pizza dough makers are buckwheat, and quinoa. Try baking with whole wheat flour. Start out slow to Add one part whole wheat flour to three parts and increase next time if you like the taste and texture.